Warm front, cold front

Warm front, cold front

Cold and warm fronts are formed where bodies of cold and warm air meet.

Geography

Keywords

warm front, cold front, weather front, weather, front line, cloud formation, cloud, precipitation, rainstorm, hail, storm, wind, atmosphere, air, air pressure, nature, geography

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Scenes

  • 400–500 km (248.5–310.7 mi)

  • 400–500 km (248.5–310.7 mi)
  • 5–6 km (3.107–3.728 mi)

  • 400–500 km (248.5–310.7 mi)
  • 400–500 km (248.5–310.7 mi)
  • 5–6 km (3.107–3.728 mi)

Narration

A warm front is formed when masses of warm and cold air meet. Cold air is heavier, so the warm air slides over it. The warm front moves slowly, so the precipitation falls evenly and steadily over a large area.
Cirrus, cirrostratus and stratus clouds are signs of an approaching warm front, followed by nimbostratus clouds. Cirrus clouds may arrive up to 1,000 kilometers (621.4 miles) before the actual warm front.

In a cold front, a cold air mass flows onto the warm air. Since cold air is denser, it stays under the warm layer and pushes it upwards, causing severe storms, hailstorms, thunderstorms and strong winds.
When the warm air is pushed up, typical, tower-like storm clouds are formed. The cold front moves rapidly, and precipitation falls within a narrow area, of about 50–70 km (31.07–43.5 mi) wide. After the withdrawal of the cold front the air is noticeably cooler, the temperature may drop by up to 15 degrees Celsius (59 degrees Fahrenheit).

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